Are you a Mr or Ms Snuffleupagus?

In other words, are you bewitched, bothered and bewildered by sinus congestion and hay fever? I know it’s not spring yet, but it is amazing how just a change in any season can make a Snuffleupagus out of many a poor sod. However, there is no need to suffer in silence anymore!

Well, you weren’t actually silent, were you? That’s part of the problem. The embarrassment of disgusting other people with your noisy nasal fluid is all part of the show. You want to say, it’s not me. It’s my allergies.  But pointing the finger doesn’t get you anywhere. You know it. I know it.

Sinus and Hayfever, but wait, there’s more…

We’re not just talking sneezing, hayfever and sinus congestion.  There is a whole list of awful, socially repellent conditions that allergies can curse us, including:

  • itchy eyes
  • persistent cough
  • wheezing
  • asthma
  • headaches

 

Can Evolve help stare-down these cruel allergies?

Strong evidence now exists that we may be able to help improve allergy type symptoms such hayfever and sinus, but there is much more than that…

We ask the obvious question. Why do I have hay fever?

The obvious question is: Why?  Why are these allergies happening to you?  Clearing up the symptoms is a mere band-aid approach. To banish the allergy from your body properly, the underlying causes of the allergy need to be looked at. In short, if you want real relief for the long haul, you need to go deep. And immune imbalances or nutritional deficiencies are generally the first port of call.

Common causes of hay fever include a reaction to:

  • certain foods and food additives
  • pesticides
  • grasses and pollens
  • dust mites
  • chemicals in personal products and cleaning products.

The food solution for sinus and hayfever

For instance, if food allergies are what is behind all this, let’s look at the usual suspects: gluten, wheat, dairy, soy, eggs, and corn. If you find your allergies flare up after eating any of these foods or your diet contains a lot of these foods, you may benefit from what we call ‘a trial separation’ (officially known as an ‘elimination diet’).  

A trial separation needn’t be agony. The idea is to avoid certain foods, then reintroduce them while monitoring your allergy symptoms.  At Evolve we have delicious replacement suggestions, for the foods you are temporarily separating from, so you won’t feel you are ‘doing without’. The experience becomes more of a food adventure.

If your allergy is being triggered by preservatives, additives or pesticides in your food, think about introducing organic foods to your diet. Organic foods not only taste better, they contain higher levels of nutrients which can be beneficial to your overall health.

Manage hay fever naturally

There are many nutrients and herbal remedies that can be used to dramatically assist the reduction of hay fever and sinus type symptoms. However without using professional advice you might find the shot gun approach is less than effective. Any treatment needs to take into account your specific circumstances to ensure the best results.

Basic tips to manage hay fever

To help balance your immune system and manage your allergy symptoms, consider the following ideas:

  • Look at taking a natural supplement for allergy relief.
  • Avoid any foods that are known allergens.
  • Increase fruit and vegetable intake, particularly those bright in colours, such as berries and capsicum, as they contain high levels of antioxidants and nutrients.
  • Avoid processed and refined foods that may contain preservatives and additives.
  • Drink at least 2 litres of filtered water per day to keep the body hydrated. 

What’s the evidence on treating hayfever and sinus?

A recent trial at Griffith University (1) showed reduction of the inflammatory markers known to be present in hayfever during a course of acupuncture over a six week period. A  study run by RMIT University (2) found similar results when treating 3 times a week over a four week period.

Another study (3) using 422 participants found improved quality of life for the acupuncture group higher than that who were provided antihistamine therapy.

A systematic review and 2 additional studies (3-5) suggest acupuncture may be a useful therapy for people who wish to use a non-medicated approach to managing of symptoms.

References:

  1. McDonald JL, Smith PK, Smith CA, Changli Xue C, Golianu B, Cripps AW. Effect of acupuncture on house dust mite specific IgE, substance P, and symptoms in persistent allergic rhinitis. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2016 Jun;116(6):497-505
  2. Xue CC, Zhang AL, Zhang CS, DaCosta C, Story DF, Thien FC. Acupuncture for seasonal allergic rhinitis: a randomized controlled trial. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2015 Oct;115(4):317-24.e1
  3. Feng S, Han M, Fan Y, Yang G, Liao Z, Liao W, et al. Acupuncture for the treatment of allergic rhinitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Am J Rhinol Allergy. 2015 Jan-Feb;29(1):57-62.
  4. Taw MB, Reddy WD, Omole FS, Seidman MD. Acupuncture and allergic rhinitis. Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2015 Jun;23(3):216-20.
  5. Seidman MD, Gurgel RK, Lin SY, Schwartz SR, Baroody FM, Bonner JR, et al. Clinical practice guideline: Allergic rhinitis. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2015 Feb;152(1 Suppl):S1-43.

Call us to discuss the best way to manage your allergies naturally – and banish the Snuffelupagus within.

Or book a session online

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Post written by
Jeff Shearer, Chinese Medicine Practitioner

References:

  1. Taw MB, Reddy WD, Omole FS, Seidman MD. Acupuncture and allergic rhinitis. Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2015 Jun;23(3):216-20.
  2. Seidman MD, Gurgel RK, Lin SY, Schwartz SR, Baroody FM, Bonner JR, et al. Clinical practice guideline: Allergic rhinitis. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2015 Feb;152(1 Suppl):S1-43.
  3. Feng S, Han M, Fan Y, Yang G, Liao Z, Liao W, et al. Acupuncture for the treatment of allergic rhinitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Am J Rhinol Allergy. 2015 Jan-Feb;29(1):57-62.
  4. Linde K, Allais G, Brinkhaus B, Fei Y, Mehring M, Shin BC, et al. Acupuncture for the prevention of tension-type headache. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2016;4:Cd007587.
  5. National Institute for Health Care and Excellence. Management of migraine (with or without aura): NICE guideline CG150. In: National Institute for Health Care and Excellence, editor. 2012 (updated 2015).
  6. Witt CM, Brinkhaus B. Efficacy, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of acupuncture for allergic rhinitis – An overview about previous and ongoing studies. Auton Neurosci. 2010 Oct 28;157(1-2):42-5.
  7. Kim SY, Lee H, Chae Y, Park HJ, Lee H. A systematic review of cost-effectiveness analyses alongside randomised controlled trials of acupuncture. Acupunct Med. 2012 Dec;30(4):273-85.
  8. Lardon A, Girard MP, Zaim C, Lemeunier N, Descarreaux M, Marchand AA. Effectiveness of preventive and treatment interventions for primary headaches in the workplace: A systematic review of the literature. Cephalalgia. 2016 Mar 2.
  9. Liu CF, Chien LW. Efficacy of acupuncture in children with asthma: a systematic review. Ital J Pediatr. 2015;41:48.
  10. Lee SH, Chang GT, Zhang X, Lee H. Acupoint Herbal Patching for Asthma: A Systematic Review and Meta- analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Medicine (Baltimore). 2016 Jan;95(2):e2439.
  11. Su L, Meng L, Chen R, Wu W, Peng B, Man L. Acupoint Application for Asthma Therapy in Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials. Forsch Komplementmed. 2016;23(1):16-21.
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